1883 Blog

Pringle of Scotland x Michael Clark Production during Milan

London Collections: Men might be over for the year, but the fun still continues with Pitti Umo in Florence and now Paris.

The shows this season contained a distinct relaxed vibe, with designers coming out with a more laidback vision of menswear come next summer. There was the obligatory slouchier silhouette, but the overall feel of each show maintained a cool, easy going and dare we say nonchalant guy.

No more apparent was this than Pringle of Scotland with their light (both in colour as well as designs) and floaty runway looks.

And this was normal runway. As well as being a key show each season, Pringle of Scotland continued to celebrate their 200th birthday, this time with an opening performance by the Michael Clark Company.

The dance piece offered the perfect poetic introduction to the show – this year held in Milan for an intimate audience of 120 guests – merging together contemporary visions with the traditional values of the brand.

And if you weren’t one of those lucky few, you can now watch the performance here and gain a better understanding of the 200th vision of Pringle.

Words by Sofia Khan

Best in New Music // Klyne

Dutch electronic-pop duo Klyne have announced the release of their infectious single ‘Paralzyed’. The track surfaced earlier this year and instantly captivated with bold, bitter-sweet hooks and shimmering electronic backbone. Now, ‘Paralzyed’ has been picked up by the ever on-point UK label Aesop (SOHN, Sylas, Tala) and is accompanied by a slick, stylist dancing video. We’re already big fans. Check out the video here:

www.facebook.com/ThisIsKlyne

Parklife 2015 Review

Probably the greatest asset of a festival is its creation of organized chaos, given that managing swathes of hedonistic festivalgoers is no easy feat. This ability to ensure the safety of its attendees whilst certifying they have the best possible time, listening to the best possible music, is something that Parklife has surely proved very adept in. Indeed, the festival this year was so impeccably organized that even the sun made a prolonged appearance, in Manchester of all places.

Aside from Parklife’s array of musical pleasures, the festival’s offering of delectable street food, surprisingly great facilities, and fairground attractions were all sure hits. Moreover, prior concerns of music tents quickly reaching capacity were easily dispelled, and ensuring you were a few minutes early to any performance virtually guaranteed a great spot. Perhaps the only negative of Parklife’s presentation was the muted and fluctuating sound on the main stage, especially prevalent throughout Disclosure’s headline slot. However, it was clear the organizers were keen to right this wrong with the clear audio on the following day with even Jessie Ware’s hushed vocals pounding around Heaton Park.

As a whole, this desire to please combined with the artist-curated line-ups definitely fostered a sense of community that reflected the festival’s intended ethos. There was a complete absence of jostling in queues, or in tents, and I personally saw no trouble whatsoever, something that critics are keen to tar Parklife with.

The shared enjoyment in being a part of baying crowd, euphoric in their demanding and receiving of the best in a plethora of musical genres is an experience that is hard to surpass. However, to simply speak about the festival’s success in broad terms would do it a disservice, so here are a few specific highlights we enjoyed:

MAC DEMARCO
Guitar-driven music is more than just a gimmick or a novelty at a festival like Parklife; it’s a representation of the broad scope of musical genres employed to please the crowds. On Saturday Mac Demarco’s crowd-pleasing was definitely in full swing, his energetic and hilarious part-goofy part-repugnant (in the best way) mannerisms energized an already fervent crowd.

After greeting “London, Manchester” Mac and Co. bizarrely unleashed a variety of Shrek quotes, revealed what hotel and room they were staying in and asked the crowd for the ‘Beckhams’ and ‘Queen Lizzie’ to appear. Firing off a passionate best-of set from ‘Salad Days’ and ‘2’ followed by a largely failed crowd dive it was clear they were having just as much fun as we were.

JULIO BASHMORE
Vice writer Clive Martin once referred to ‘Au Seve’ as the ‘Smells like teen spirit’ of the house revival. But, Julio is clearly not pretending to be Kurt Cobain, although some would argue that he delivers a similar ecstasy, especially in the record’s famously direct bassline. Julio instead offered a great tribal-infected set at ‘The Temple’ stage, gaining one of the festival’s biggest crowds for a daytime slot as his swerving beats certainly induced a festival atmosphere of playfulness and elation.

ZED BIAS
Upon entering the ‘Drop The Mustard’ stage on Sunday, weary from the night’s previous gratifications, I was disappointed to walk straight to the front of an empty tent. Surely Manchester’s dance music Godfather deserved better, or had everyone just seen it all before? Well it was fair to say he soon got the grateful reception he deserved. A frenzied display, aided by the help of his new live show drew in the crowds, and five minutes later it was clear to see the masses had come to their senses. By the time the anthem ‘Neighborhood’s’ first chords had played Zed was in full flow, much to the appreciation of a now full tent, honoring one of the greatest contributors to Manchester’s continually thriving music scene.

WOOKIE & DJ Q
If Zed Bias had revived the crowd then the bassline champions would surely send them into overdrive. A typically manic set by Wookie & DJ Q displayed their almost ‘ADHD’ approach to mixing, with complex but swift changeovers making the crowd (and us) lose our bleary eyes and hungover heads.

WAZE & ODYSSEY
The first time on Sunday that I had actually seen Waze & Odyssey was in Manchester Piccadilly station as I overheard them bickering on the escalator behind, “If I had listened to you we would still be on that train!”. Struggling to find the taxi rank to take them to a festival they were playing in just a few hours would perhaps cast doubt on the capability of the unit’s abilities. Yet, the meteoric success of the house duo has been clearly chartered and it was evident they are capable of performing on the world’s biggest stages. Rosé wine in hand, they smashed through a blistering set, a highlight being Patrick Topping’s ‘Voicemail’, hardly a sing along anthem but one that the ardent fans screeched in rapture, a telling indicator of their knack for timing and momentum.

DUSKY
Atop of the hill called the ‘G-Stage’ Dusky’s hard hitting tech-house was a real treat. Pumping hi-hats and booming basslines are hardly unique in a festival like Parklife, but it was clear that Dusky’s set was uniquely passionate and precise. As ‘Careless’ played and the sun set with the final rays creeping into the tent it was clear that they are something different live.

NAS
Hearing the entirety of Nas’ opus ‘Illmatic’ would surely excite even the most casual of hip-hop fans. The genre-defining album was definitely conveyed in the most emphatic of manners as Nas illustrated his continuing contemporary relevance with an artistic set. The rare opportunity to witness a master at work was met with the most thunderous of appreciation as Nas superbly took us back to Queensbridge in 1994.

JAMIE XX
It is perhaps fitting that Jamie XX, one of the most eclectic artists in recent years, releasing an equally extensive critically acclaimed album, would be playing at Heaton Park. After a similarly rolling set from Nicholas Jaar at the ‘Now Wave’ stage, Jamie XX, records in hand, was sure to rejoice with the awe-filled crowd. Yet his set, including a decidedly great big room edit of Room 5’s ‘Make Luv’, was hardly full of crowd-pleasers, but that was clearly never his intention. Instead the sometimes-nervous London-based producer assuredly sent the crowd to dizzying new heights, even greater than the now widely documented stage climber.

The triumphant final track of his set, ‘Loud Places’, disclosed the paradoxical smallness and giganticness of the producer’s success. Playing a song describing the pained notion of being desperately alone to an adoring crowd certainly held more than a hint of irony. If he asks “Didn’t I take you to, higher places you can’t reach without me?” Jamie surely knows the response, he and Parklife did, let’s just hope the festival does stick around.

For more information visit www.parklife.uk.com

Words by Ben Bulter

 

 

 

 

Field Maneuvers 2015

In the build up to another British summer, it seems as if there is a new electronic music festival born each week. These big budget behemoths lure in vast amounts of attendees with glossy branding and replicant line-ups of the usual pedestrian-house suspects. It seems inevitable that someday this bubble will pop, as the festival scene becomes overly diluted with homogenous events, the supply will soon exceed demand. There are only so many Navajo headdress toting twenty-somethings and slickback shufflers.

In this post-scarcity economy, the niche festival is king. We are talking about stripped-back grassroots events like Farr Festival (take a look on what went down in 2014) and Freerotation. For the keen eyed, early adopting music head that seeks out such gatherings, the rewards are plentiful. Well curated line-ups and a crowd void of Essex day-trippers trying Mandy for the first time. 

One new promising star in this movement is Field Maneuvers. Only in its third year, this micro-festival takes over a secret location in the Oxfordshire countryside and sees as little as 500 revellers gather to enjoy a line-up that reads like a techno connoisseur cheat-sheet.

It’s hard not to draw parallels to “everyone’s favourite festival you’ve never been to” , the elusive, hyper-exclusive Freerotation; famed for having an application process so long you wouldn’t be surprised if there was a clause expecting blood sacrifice and your first born child. From what we hear, it’s worth the wait. However, with Field Maneuvers all you must part with is the very reasonable cost of a weekend ticket. 

The line-up focuses on the rough and ready side of house, techno and disco; Berghain mainstay Ryan Elliott, UK techno overlord Ben Sims, disco-punk The Black Madonna and Detroit royalty Marcellus Pittman, all the way through to the weightier tones of Blawan and even grime’s godfather DJ Slimzee. What better way to spend the final days of summer than getting up close and personal with some of the world’s finest selectors until the wee hours and leaving with 499 new friends.

With such a small number of tickets we suggest you don’t sleep on this one. Buy your ticket and find out more here.
Words by David March.

Mary Katrantzou for adidas originals

She’s done it again: Mary Katrantzou, Queen of the digital print has teamed up with adidas originals to release her second collection with the sportswear brand.

We first came across the collection when hitting press days last month, and since then have had a pretty difficult time keeping tight lipped. Well, no more!

Katrantzou is well known for her unmistakable iconic prints; one item of hers will take your outfit from “bleaurgh” to Stand Out faster than saying “wowzer”, and this collection with adidas is no different.

This season the designer looks back to 80s workout and fitness imagery – you know, spandex in birght primary block colour, sweatbands galore… – to create abstract collage of figurative motifs superimposed onto everything from outwear to kicks. But while the 80s might inspire the collection, Mr. Motivation this is not.

Expect Katrantzou drama, adidas luxe, colour (and lots of it) and of course fantastical digital motifs. We won’t reveal everything but lets just say that you can expect to find of all things: a stop watch, a tennis racket and even a shuttlecock giving a subtle yet extremely witty ode to adidas’ athletic tradition.

We’re ready to fight you for the last Katrantzou x Adidas Superstar in SIZE 6.

adidas Originals by Mary Katrantzou will be available in stores, at adidas.co.uk and marykatrantzou.com from July 2015 onwards.

 Words by Sofia Khan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Festival preview by Fables: MADE BIRMINGHAM 2015

Returning to The Digbeth Triangle for 2015, MADE Birmingham debuted last year to huge success, being nominated for Best Metropolitan Festival in the UK Festival Awards. On Saturday 25th July there will be stellar headline sets from from MK and Wilkinson and performances from the likes of Claude VonStroke, Heidi, Julio Bashmore, Beardyman, David Rodigan and Norman Jay.

To celebrate the festival, the art collective Fables have illustrated 5 of the headliners for 1883. Founded in Birmingham, Fables was a collaboration between friends that eventually grew to encompass stage design, garment printing and festival installations. Fables will be heading up the creative design for the festival decor, having worked on projects for Secret Garden Party, Outlook and Shambala before. Have a look at the masterful illustrations below:

Claude

Beardyman

Heidi

Rodigan

MK

LINEUP

SATURDAY 25TH JULY

MK, WILKINSON

BEARDYMAN, BLONDE (LIVE), CLAUDE VONSTROKE, DAVID RODIGAN,

DOORLY, DORSIA, DUSKY, FONO, FRICTION, HEIDI, JULIO BASHMORE,

LEE FOSS, MATRIX & FUTUREBOUND, NIGHTMARES ON WAX (DJ SET), NORMAN JAY MBE, PALEMAN, PHILIP GEORGE, PLEASURE STATE (LEE FOSS, MARC KINCHEN, ANABEL ENGLUND), STANTON WARRIORS, SUBB-AN & ADAM SHELTON, TROJAN SOUNDSYSTEM (DEX N FX)

& MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED

SUNDAY 26TH JULY

FOOD PROGRAMMING FROM DIGBETH DINING CLUB:

PLATINUM PANCAKES, MEAT SHACK, CANOODLE, ESMIE’S, SAVANNA GRILL, BIG, DADDIES DINER, DELIZIE ITALIANE, BUDDHA BELLY, HABANERO, FYBIN AND LOIN, BAKED IN BRICK, MEATHEADS, FAT DUCK SPUDS

Third Release and VIP tickets for Saturday and £5 earlybird tickets are on sale now from www.madebirmingham.com

Curated by @elspethmerry

LCMSS16 – Day 4 – TIGER OF SWEDEN – Backstage

Photography by Asia Werbel

www.asiawerbel.photography

LCMSS16 – Day 4 – John Smedley – Presentation

Photography by Nicole Gomes

www.nicolemgomes.com

LCMSS16 – Day 4 – Joseph Turvey – Presentation

Photography by Nicole Gomes

www.nicolemgomes.com

LCMSS16 – Day 4 – BOBBY ABLEY – Catwalk

Photography by Nicole Gomes

www.nicolemgomes.com